Clara in Beechworth

Clara in Beechworth

We are torn between nostalgia for the familiar and an urge for the foreign and strange. As often as not, we are homesick most for the places we have never known.
Carson McCullers (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via bettyc)

If you have any doubt that the hashtag is a frighteningly powerful tool in our modern vocabulary, imagine a person you care about texting you that song’s title line out of the blue: “You’re beautiful.” Now think of the same person texting, “You’re #beautiful.” The second one is jokey, ironic, distant—and hey, maybe that’s what that person was going for. But it also hammers home that point that the internet too often asserts: You’re not as original as you once thought. “Beautiful” is analog, unquantifiable, one-in-a-million. #Beautiful, on the other hand, is crowded terrain. Ten more people have just tweeted about something or someone #beautiful since you started reading this sentence.

As more and more of our daily interactions become text-based — people preferring texting to phone calls, workplaces that rely heavily email and instant messaging—we’re developing ways to stretch our written language so it can communicate more nuance, so we can tell people what we mean without accidentally leading them on or pissing them off. Periods have becomemore forceful, commas less essential, and over the last few years, the hashtag has morphed into something resembling the fabled sarcasm font—the official keystroke of irony. Putting a hashtag in front of something you text, email, or IM to someone is a sly way of saying “I’m joking,” or maybe more accurately, “I mean this and I don’t at the same time.”

The #Art of the Hashtag

Thanks to Twitter, the hashtag has become an important linguistic shortcut. But while everyone from Robin Thicke to Beyoncé has used the symbol as part of their art, only a few have truly taken advantage of its culture-jamming possibilities.

Via @pitchforkmedia

(via npr)

(via bettyc)

tamorapierce:

panzertron:

“We’ve never had a female President in this country, which I find stunning” - Hari Kondabolu 

Finally, there is a gif set of this.

I love this man.

nailed it.

(Source: majiinboo, via upworthy)

She deserves better, you say. I say: You’re a goddamn coward. What she deserves is an actual person she can connect with. She deserves you, or me or the entire world; she deserves someone achingly real and honest. She deserves a human being equally raw to pursue her and love her and, perhaps, destroy her emotionally, but she deserves all that as well. She doesn’t deserve anyone’s sugary fairytale. She deserves to float freely, with you, or me, or the world, into the very depths of her own psychosynthesis. She deserves to explore the meaning of the word "intimacy", with someone beside her that will care regardless. She fucking deserves all of it. So, pluck up the courage and be with her or leave her in peace but don’t you dare "sell" her your own "inadequacy" as a lie so that, again, you manage to comfort your conscience and eventually come to feel that you love her exactly because you’re letting her go. Because, darling, that’s bullshit. That’s only your own little self-created lie laying behind a much bigger lie; it’s not even properly concealed within itself, you fucking idiot.
All These Things You Wish You’d Say (via letters-to-nobody)

(via wildrejoicingwaters)

humansofnewyork:

"I can’t stand moral absolutism. You know, there’s always that guy who wants to point out that Martin Luther King cheated on his wife— as if he obviously couldn’t have been a great person if he did something like that. Or someone will bring out an inspirational quote, and get you to agree, and then inform you that Hitler said it. As if a good thought couldn’t come from Hitler. Moral absolutism keeps us from learning from the past. It’s easy to say: ‘Hitler was a demon. Nazis were all bad seeds.’ That’s simple. It’s much harder to say: ‘Is that humanity? Is that me?’"

humansofnewyork:

"I can’t stand moral absolutism. You know, there’s always that guy who wants to point out that Martin Luther King cheated on his wife— as if he obviously couldn’t have been a great person if he did something like that. Or someone will bring out an inspirational quote, and get you to agree, and then inform you that Hitler said it. As if a good thought couldn’t come from Hitler. Moral absolutism keeps us from learning from the past. It’s easy to say: ‘Hitler was a demon. Nazis were all bad seeds.’ That’s simple. It’s much harder to say: ‘Is that humanity? Is that me?’"

(via jokelifeclub)

My mate joshhab takes a bloody good photo.  This is one he took for a Movember calendar we made to raise money for Men’s Health.  You can buy one for $10 at www.themenofmovember.com

My mate joshhab takes a bloody good photo.  This is one he took for a Movember calendar we made to raise money for Men’s Health.  You can buy one for $10 at www.themenofmovember.com

(via joshhab-deactivated20140121)

littlerubywolff asked: Actually, they have come up with a 100% effective, reversible birth control shot for men. Huffington post has an article about it from April 2012.

edwardspoonhands:

I generally find that HuffPo is not a super-reliable source of information considering that they allow anyone to write anything on their site.

The procedure you’re referring to is not a “shot.” It’s an outpatient medical producedure in which a polymer is inserted directly into the vas deferens. It’s basically a vasectomy delivered through a simpler means, which is great, but it isn’t, like, a shot in the arm. It’s an outpatient medical procedure. It also isn’t approved by the FDA and is still research trials. 

That’s not to say that it isn’t an interesting possibility and that it sounds way better than a normal vasectomy. But, yeah, the HuffPo article made it sound like a completely different thing…intentionally.

They’re in it for the clicks, not to inform people of actual true things.

"They’re in it for the clicks, not to inform people of actual true things."

- Hank Green hitting the nail on the head with his description of Huffington Post.

I love new media, and I love the new and exciting ways that stories are being told.  But I think HuffPo are on the wrong end of new media, where everything is exaggerated to get our attention.  It’s insulting, as if the only reason we will click is if they invent some conflict that isn’t there.

Their headlines are too often intentionally misleading and so I’m making a habit of avoiding their links.

HuffPo links are the equivalent of a Daily Telegraph front page and that’s not a positive comparison.

"Everybody has to leave, everybody has to leave their home and come back so they can love it again for all new reasons… Leave. Roll it around on your tongue for a bit. It is a beautiful word, isn’t it? So strong and forceful, the way you have always wanted to be. And you will not be alone. You have never been alone. Don’t worry. Everything will still be here when you get back. It is you who will have changed"-Donald Miller

"Everybody has to leave, everybody has to leave their home and come back so they can love it again for all new reasons… Leave. Roll it around on your tongue for a bit. It is a beautiful word, isn’t it? So strong and forceful, the way you have always wanted to be. And you will not be alone. You have never been alone. Don’t worry. Everything will still be here when you get back. It is you who will have changed"
-Donald Miller



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